Hand Protection

Glove Materials

Natural Rubber – Natural rubber gloves are widely used because of their snag, puncture, abrasion and cut resistance. They are
very comfortable and permit excellent dexterity. They are also an economical alternative to nitrile or neoprene. natural rubber
gloves contain proteins that can cause allergic reactions, so they are not recommended for everyone. Natural rubber also will
also swell and degrade when coming in contact with various animal fats, oils and solvents.
Nitrile – Nitrile gloves are the most effective replacement for natural rubber, vinyl and neoprene. Nitrile offers excellent protection
against acids, bases, oils, solvents, esters, grease and animal fats. Nitrile gloves are more resistant to snags, punctures,
abrasions and cuts than neoprene or polyvinylchloride gloves. Nitrile does not contain latex proteins which can cause allergic
reactions. Because nitrile gloves are so versatile, they are ideal for use in laboratories, automotive
and aircraft part-handling and assembly, plant cleaning, chemical processing, food processing, petroleum refining, dip tank
operations, acid etching, painting, graphic arts, battery manufacturing, degreasing, electronics and pesticide handling.
Neoprene – Neoprene gloves are an effective replacement for natural rubber and vinyl. Neoprene offers excellent protection
against acids, alcohols, oils, solvents, esters, grease and animal fats. Neoprene gloves are resistant to snags, punctures,
abrasion and cuts. Neoprene does not contain latex proteins that can cause allergic reactions. Neoprene gloves are versatile
because they are chemical-resistant and can withstand temperature fluctuations.
PVC – PVC gloves provide excellent resistance to most fats, oils, acids, caustics and petroleum hydrocarbons. They are
resistant to alcohols and glycol ethers but not aromatics, aldehydes and ketones. In particular, PVC gloves are good for
handling such chemicals as: citric acid (10%), cyclohexane, ethylene glycol, formaldehyde, formic acid, glycerine, hydrochloric
acid (linseed oil, perchloric acid, potassium hydroxide and tannic acid.) Because PVC gloves have excellent abrasion
resistance, they are ideal for use in petrochemical, construction and industrial applications.
Polyester/Cotton – Poly/cotton blends are commonly used in the string knit gloves because of their comfort, durability and
excellent laundering characteristics. By mixing polyester with cotton, shrinkage can be minimized.
Kevlar® – Kevlar is a man-made organic fiber developed for use in high performance applications. The par-aramid fiber has a
high resistance to cuts and slashes which makes it ideal for use in applications where sharp objects are being used. The high
tensile strength and low weight of Kevlar makes it durable yet lightweight to wear. Kevlar is flame resistant, self-extinguishes
and can be used in elevated temperatures. Kevlar® is a registered trademark of the Dupont company.
Leather – Leather is the hide or skin of an animal. The most widely used leather for gloves is cowhide. Other leathers used
are pigskin, goatskin and deerskin. Leather is used because it offers abrasion resistance, is flexible and allows air through
its pores. Hides are processed in tanneries by applying chrome sulfate and bichromate of potash (the reason they are called
“chrome tanned”) along with coloring agents. After processing, the hides are split. The durability of leather is in direct proportion
to its thickness and not to its location on the animal.

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Showing 1–12 of 52 results